Posted by: theheartlander | March 2, 2011

Keeping us off balance: The Left’s strategy of sound and fury

As the ruckus in Madison, WI, goes on and on and ON, I think it would be useful to step back and take a look at the big picture.  You may have heard of the Cloward-Piven strategy, which is to so overwhelm “the system” that it collapses — at which point the fundamental restructuring of society that socialists desire can theoretically take place. (In reality, what always happens is chaos followed by tyranny.)

Allen West has often said that conservatives need to be familiar with Saul Alinsky’s Rules for Radicals. We have to know the enemy’s strategy if we want to counter and defeat it.

Toward that end, I would like to offer some wisdom from David Kupelian, from his book How Evil Works. As the level of noise and rancor keeps escalating in Wisconsin — and as the agitators keep trying to disguise their real motives from the public — I’ve thought often of what Kupelian says in a section titled “Using Lies to Create a Crisis”:

One of the most creative uses of lying — and a key tactic for bending a population to your will — is the creation of a crisis.

…[M]aybe you’ve heard of the “Cloward-Piven Strategy” — inspired by left-wing radical organizer Saul Alinsky, whose methods Barack Obama adopted — which openly advocates the creation of crises to destroy capitalist society. This is how socialist progress is achieved “peacefully”: through conflict or crisis, which always is resolved in the direction of greater socialism.

The problem is, this “crisis creation” talk just sounds so crazy, so foreign to us, that it’s hard to believe our fellow human beings, no matter how confused or deluded, could actually engage in such a practice. But it’s not only true, it’s actually a common part of everyday life.

Consider this nonpolitical example and note how it illustrates the power of a crisis to mold people to the deceiver’s will: In one child abduction case, a little girl was approached after school by a man she didn’t know. He claimed her house was burning down, that her parents were busy putting out the fire, and that he was a friend of the parents, who had asked him to pick up their daughter and take her to them. The crisis — and the emotional upset the girl experienced over the thought of her house being on fire and her parents in danger — drowned out her normal caution about getting into a car with a stranger. You guessed it: the stranger was a predator who had concocted the lie for the sole purpose of upsetting and thereby tricking the girl into going with him so he could brutalize and murder her.

This tragic story makes an important point: a crisis throws us off our guard, upsets us, and inclines us to make decisions and accept “solutions” we normally reject.

[all boldface mine]

Think back to September 2008.

In the space of less than 2 hours, the Federal Reserve noticed a tremendous drawdown of money market accounts in the U.S. to the tune of $550 billion. Rep. Paul Kanjorski of Pennsylvania said that if authorities had not closed the banks, $5.5 trillion would have been withdrawn from U.S. banks, which would have caused the collapse of the U.S. within 24 hours.

We will leave it to others to speculate as to what person, persons or foreign governments might have decided that such a development, less than 2 months before the presidential election, would be in their interests. In any case, the financial crisis caused normally cool heads to panic and pass TARP — some of which funds, by the way, may still end up being used as a slush fund for Democrat-supporting interest groups.

“A crisis throws us off our guard… and presses us to choose options we would normally reject.”

Sounds like a capsule summary of the Obama Administration.

Health care reform… Quick! Now! It’s a crisis! People are dying! Do something! Fix it! Pass the bill, any bill! Don’t read it, don’t debate it, just pass it! Right now!

Financial regulatory reform… Hurry! It’s a crisis! Wall Street is raping the country! Fix it quick! Now! Not a moment to lose!  We’ll deal with Fannie and Freddie later! We’ll deal with the small-town banks later! Who cares about them! We’ve got to pass something — anything — right now!

Carbon dioxide emissions… Help! The temperature’s rising, the icecaps are melting, the planet is dying! (What? The main climate scientists lied? Well, then, make the lies BIGGER!!) Pass cap-and-trade! Quick! What, Congress won’t pass it?! Then have the EPA do it! Now! Quick! While our guy’s still in office!

You see the pattern. And it’s nothing new. Tyrants have used it for ages.

Kupelian writes that during World War II, the U.S. government’s Office of Strategic Services assessed Hitler’s methods this way:

His primary rules were: never allow the public to cool off; never admit a fault or wrong; never concede that there may be some good in your enemy; never leave room for alternatives; never accept blame; concentrate on one enemy at a time and blame him for everything that goes wrong; people will believe a big lie sooner than a little one; and if you repeat it frequently enough people will sooner or later believe it.

Sounds an awful lot like Alinsky, doesn’t it? Do you suppose Hitler thought of himself as a “community organizer”?

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Responses

  1. “Never let a good crisis go to waste.” ~ Rahm Emmanuel, former White House Chief of Staff, and soon-to-be mayor of Chicago, Illinois

  2. My Dear Fellow-Patriot,

    As always, concise. Succinct. DEAD-ON.

    Sharing on my FB pages.
    CM Sackett


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